Red-capped Cardinal

These songbirds, also known as red-crested cardinals, are commonly called Brazilian cardinals in some South American regions. They have strong legs with large feet that allow them to walk on floating vegetation while feeding. Red-capped cardinals are quite social and often found in pairs or groups as they forage. Their bright red heads and black-and-white […]

Northern Helmeted Curassow

The Northern helmeted curassow is one of the largest birds in the South American forests — about the size of a wild turkey. It’s a very elusive bird, moving quite slowly through the thick underbrush during the twilight hours. The call of the Northern helmeted curassow is a prolonged, low-pitch grunting or groaning sound.

Laysan Teal Duck

The color teal was actually named after the blaze of color found on this duck’s wings! In the past, about 200 years ago, these ducks resided on all the Hawaiian Islands. Today, they are only found on Laysan Island, which is just 1.5 miles in size.

American Avocet

American avocets are long-legged shorebirds with a long, thin bill that curves upward and distinctive black-and-white stripes on their back and sides. They swoop with their long bills back and forth in the water to catch insects and aquatic crustaceans. They often travel in flocks of several hundred.

Gentoo Penguin

Gentoo penguins breed in colonies of a few hundred pairs and often construct their nests from rocks and anything else they can find in the harsh, Antarctic landscape. Gentoos can make as many as 500 dives a day searching for food! They’re a lot of fun to watch — keepers describe them as very curious, […]

Whooping Crane

Whooping Crane

At roughly 60 inches in height, the whooping crane is the tallest bird in North America. Whooping cranes mate for life. The whooping crane’s courtship dance involves leaping, head-pumping, kicking, and wing-sweeping.